Outreachy is a 501(c)(3) non-profit under our parent organization, Software Freedom Conservancy, and donations are tax deductible.

Outreachy internship stipends, travel fund, and program costs are supported by our generous donors. Whether you're an individual wanting to support diversity in tech, or a corporation that uses Free and Open Source Software, we invite you to support Outreachy!


Mozilla community sponsor Larissa Shapiro, with former Outreachy interns (now Mozilla employees) Sara Mansouri and Maja Frydrychowicz

Mozilla community coordinator, Larisa Shaprio (middle), with former Outreachy interns Maja Frydrychowicz (left) and Sara Mansouri (right). Both Maja and Sara became Mozilla employees after their Outreachy internships. (Photo CC-BY-SA-NC Sarah Sharp)

Current Sponsors

Thank you to the sponsors for our May to August 2017 internship round:

Ceiling Smasher: Mozilla

Equalizer: Red Hat

Promoters: Bloomberg, Google, Intel, linux.conf.au, Wikimedia Foundation

Includers: Cadasta, Codethink, CodeWeavers, Collabora, Debian, DigitalOcean, GNOME Foundation, Goldman Sachs, Igalia, Lightbend, Linux Australia, Linux Foundation, OpenStack Foundation, Shopify, Sugar Labs, Yocto Project.

Outreachy is hosted by Software Freedom Conservancy with the special support from Red Hat and the GNOME Foundation. Linux Conf Australia fundraised for Outreachy during the conference and, in addition to many generous donations by attendees, Linux Australia made a contribution.

Individual Donors

If you're an individual interested in donating to Outreachy, see our personal donation instructions.

Corporate Sponsors

Our corporate sponsors can support Outreachy by donating in any combination of three ways:

1. Internship stipends for a specific set of Free and Open Source (FOSS) communities. Corporate donors often want to support the FOSS projects they use internally, and sponsoring internships for a specific FOSS community is a wonderful way to support free and open source software development.

2. Internship stipends for any FOSS community participating in Outreachy. Each community that participates in Outreachy internships must secure funding for at least one intern. Every internship round, some FOSS Communities find they have more outstanding applicants than they have funding for. Communities can ask for additional internship funding from the Outreachy general fund.

3. Outreachy general fund. This covers program costs, organizer time, travel and outreach to communities traditionally underrepresented in tech. The general fund is also used to fund additional outstanding applicants to the Outreachy program.

Corporate sponsors' logos are proudly displayed on the Outreachy home page. We publicly thank sponsors who are Promoter level and above on the Outreachy twitter account, which is followed by a diverse set of FOSS contributors. Corporate sponsors of all levels are welcome to send opportunities to a private opt-in mailing list for Outreachy interns, alumni, and mentors. Outreachy also lists sponsor career pages on the opportunities page.

Sponsorship Levels

Please consider sponsoring the program at one of these game-changing levels:

Ceiling Smasher: $52,000

Equalizer: $32,500

Promoter: $19,500

Includer: $6,500

Donations of any amount can be made to the Outreachy general fund. When a sponsor chooses to sponsor an Outreachy internship, they can sponsor any number of interns at $6,500 each. The internship sponsorship covers the $5,000 intern stipend, a $500 intern travel stipend, and a $500 administrative fee Software Freedom Conservancy.

Why Sponsor Diversity in FOSS?

Women are under-represented in Free and Open Source Software development, even as compared with the number of women studying Computer Science in colleges around the world and with the number of women employed in proprietary software development. Outreachy has been a major factor in increasing participation of women in FOSS from 1.1% in 2002 to 11% in 2013 and increasing participation of women in Google Summer of Code from 7.1% in 2011 to 12% in 2016. Communities that make outreach efforts are the ones that are responsible for these increases.

The diversity data for the U.S. released by many tech companies shows that many of them only have 1-3% Black and 2-4% Hispanic employees in technical roles, while the population of the U.S. is 13% Black and 17% Hispanic. We don't have any data like this for free software participation, but we can tell there is a lack of racial and ethnic diversity at conferences we attend.

It's important that we reach more people with the information that the FOSS community is (by and large) mature and friendly, and that contributing to FOSS is valuable for both social and professional reasons. In this way, we are growing the community and improving our ability to reach even more people.

The program provides a collaborative environment in which newcomers from underrepresented backgrounds can get help working on their first contributions and a focused opportunity for them to dedicate a full-time effort to learning and contributing to FOSS. The program also assists people with finding mentors to help them with their projects. By participating in the program, interns develop a good understanding of the power of FOSS and skills necessary to continue contributing to it.

Why Sponsor Outreachy?

The program attracts many motivated and talented applicants. Most of our interns have had their work included in the software releases, with some of them completing major features during their internships. About half of the program participants stay involved with the organization they worked with past their internship, and 118 from among 368 past participants accomplished one or more of the following: The outreach efforts like this one also result in the improvements for all newcomers. For example, the mentors list that GNOME started with 9 mentors for the first round of the Outreach Program for Women is now a general resource that contains over 40 mentors. GNOME also improved how it engages Google Summer of Code students with the community based on its Outreach Program for Women experience, by requiring them to work with mentors on an initial contribution during the application period and by incorporating the required blog posts about their work on Planet GNOME. Making the community a friendly place for underrepresented people also makes it such for all newcomers.

Commonly Asked Questions

Q: Are corporate sponsors required to help run the internship program?
A: No. The Outreachy application process, intern selection coordination, communication with mentors, and payments to interns are all handled by Outreachy organizers.

Q: When do you bill for sponsorship?
A: For the May to August round, sponsors are billed in May. For the December to March round, sponsors are billed in December. If you have a specific quarterly deadline, Outreachy can bill earlier or later. Outreachy general fund sponsors can be billed any time of the year. Billing will be handled through our parent organization, the Software Freedom Conservancy.

Q: Who pays the interns?
A: The Outreachy parent organization, the Software Freedom Conservancy, handles payments to interns.

Q: Are Outreachy interns employees or interns of the corporate sponsors?
A: No. Outreachy interns are considered contractors of the Software Freedom Conservancy during their internship.

Q: We have a company internship program. How does that work with Outreachy internships?
A: Outreachy internships are completely separate from any other internship program. Outreachy organizers find FOSS communities that are willing to provide mentorship and use corporate sponsorship to fund the internships.

Q. If I'm a corporate sponsor, do I have to provide a mentor for the internship program?
A: No. While employees from many corporate sponsors mentor for Outreachy, it's not required for corporate sponsors to provide either mentors or internship project ideas. FOSS communities generally provide their own mentors and project ideas. If a sponsor does have an internship idea and a mentor, they should review the community guidelines.

Q: If I sponsor a specific FOSS community and that community doesn't find an intern, what happens?
A: Sometimes FOSS communities don't have enough applicants, or their best applicant accepts another opportunity. If a FOSS community doesn't find the right intern, sponsors will not be charged for the internship. Sponsors can also choose to have Outreachy bill them and save the funding for the FOSS community in future rounds. Sponsors also have the option of donating the unused funding to another FOSS community's internship or the Outreachy general fund.

Q: How does the travel stipend work? Can interns use it to go to a company event?
A: The $500 Outreachy travel stipend is for intern travel to technical conferences with free and open source content, or events where interns can network with their mentor and members of their FOSS community. Company events may meet our travel stipend guidelines, if the intern's mentor agrees it is the best use of their travel stipend.

Q: What happens if an intern doesn't use their travel stipend?
A: Travel stipends can be used for travel initiated within a year after the beginning of the internship. Unused travel allowances will be added to the Outreachy general funds.

Q: Did you used to be called something else?
A: Outreachy was known in the past as the Outreachy Program for Women (OPW). The name was changed when we expanded the program to include additional underrepresented people in tech. Before the program was called OPW, it was known as the GNOME Women's Summer Outreach Program. The name changed to OPW after the program expanded to include additional different free and open source software communities.

Q: Are you still associated with GNOME?
A: GNOME has been an Outreachy mentoring community since the beginning of Outreachy's history. After Outreachy moved under our fiscal parent organization, the Software Freedom Conservancy, GNOME continued to host some Outreachy resources, including our website, wiki, application system, and IRC channel. We thank GNOME for their support of the program.